Pets and Masters in Space: Part 1: The First Voyage by Elfa Todari

Summary:

A young adult female, her cat and a technologically advanced telepathic adolescent alien male struggle to understand each other, themselves and their ever-changing world on a journey into outer space.
One million years in the future, Antaska accepts employment with an alien who will take her and her cat on an exploratory trip into space. Unknown to her, the aliens (Verdantes) hire human companions because they want them as pets. M. Hoyvil, her 650-year-old adolescent alien supervisor (in actuality her new owner), does not realize that although humans are assumed to be non-telepathic, she has some telepathic abilities and understands some of his conversations.
Antaska is soon distracted from the confusing sounds she hears by the inappropriate attentions of an un-Earthly attractive human male fitness instructor. Both he and his human female partner are irresistibly beautiful and incredibly powerful due to genetic manipulation in the aliens’ birth labs. The female becomes jealous and takes violent action against Antaska, always staying within the bounds of what is allowed by the Verdantes in her role as Antaska’s martial arts trainer.
In order to resolve a situation spiraling toward increasing violence and betrayal, Antaska must confront her own human but destructive desires. In his own desire to protect her, M. Hoyvil fights against the adult authority that has set strict limits on interference with humans. His martial arts master, a psychic Verdente adult, predicts that the conflicts he and Antaska are experiencing will prepare them for even greater dangers they will face in deep space. Part 1 ends with an emotional bond beginning to form between the three main characters as they land at the first stop on their journey, the home planet of the Verdante.

Overall

This was not a romance. It was a cute short story that could easily be a sci-fi adventure, but not a romance. I really struggled with the character of Antaska, but by the end she had redeemed herself. M. Hoyvil and her cat, Potat, made up for it though! (Gosh I loved that kitty.) The book does a far amount of head hopping which was confusing on more than one occasion as there are no clear transitions. The setting was vivid and interesting. The plot was a slow and uninteresting for most of the first half but after a key chapter happens about half way through, the book gets more interesting and quite enjoyable.

Rating

3 stars

Although this wasn’t a romance (as it was originally categorized) it was a cute enjoyable little book. Just get over the first little hump and know that Antaska will be less annoying in the second half, and you’ll be sure to fly right through it!

This is a voluntary review.

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Dust and Ashes (Prosperine Trilogy 0.5) by P.J. McDermott

Summary:

In 2095 AD, near Hierapolis in Turkey, an elderly priest is exploring an archaeological dig looking for ancient artefacts. Inside a nearby cave, he discovers a chamber containing a limestone burial box.

What does the box contain? The answer will take the world to the brink of an apocalyptic war and change the future of the human race.

This 10,000 word short story is the prequel to the scifi—fantasy adventure, the Prosperine Trilogy, featuring the space heroine Hickory Lace. It takes place eighty-four years before the first book in the series, Avanaux, and deals with the cataclysmic events on the planet Earth leading to the formation of the Alien Corps.

Overall

This short story packs a punch. A lot happens in a very short number of pages and it was expertly written. Absolutely fascinating take on Christianity and the future of religion without being preachy. Easy to read with vivid scenes and enough characters to make me wonder where it was going next. For sure sucked me into the world the author painted.

I did doubt the coincidence at the start of the book, however.  The timing right at the start of an Earthquake happening and they just happen to be there. Once I got over that small hurdle I really enjoyed it.

Rating

4 stars

If I had to pick one saying for this short story, I’d say ‘pleasantly surprised.’

This review is voluntary.

Gamma (League of Worlds Book 1) by M Wiggins

Summary

Often broody, suspicious of those he doesn’t know well, islander, Alec Ellison, has spent his whole life hiding what makes him different. Then uninvited newcomers arrive to bring him to his rightful home, a world where he is so much more than DNA. Oppressive or not, though, life on Gamma is all he’s ever known and leaving doesn’t come easy for him. When he learns that the island and its inhabitants will likely be destroyed if he leaves, he struggles to decide if free will is worth the senseless loss of life.

There are only three ways onto Gamma, an island where liberty is an abstract facade: you’re born here, arrive by invitation, or you sneak in. Invited newcomers are rare and serve only two purposes: to keep the existing population from growing bored, or to increase the population with their approved genetic blue-print. Either way, once an islander, always an islander, and leaving the petri dish is not an option.

The Stone Davis Corporation owns all, controls all, and makes all your decisions. You accept what they give, and what they take away, but understand that management takes way more than they give. Everything you know is a lie. To escape is to resist and no battle worth fighting has ever come cheap.

Wherever law ends, tyranny begins. A war is coming, and GAMMA is the cradle of its genesis.

Characters

There are almost too many main characters in this book to talk about them all but I’ll try to touch on the main ones. Meg changes a lot through the book and I was most conflicted about her character. Although I liked her sometimes I didn’t like some of her choices and I felt like she was a slave to the plot rather than a driver behind it. Alec is probably my least favorite character, he continually disappointed me throughout the book. I was unsure of Tavis at the beginning (am I the only one who had a hard time not reading Travis? I thought she was a he at first). However, by the end of the book she had grown on me. Jack…I’m still now sure about Jack. I liked him sort of in the start, but something about him always…just didn’t sit right. Favorite character by far was Sebastian. I loved the relationship between him and Tavis. I can’t talk about any other characters without giving stuff away, but be aware there are lots of them.

Even though the characters became unique and interesting, it was difficult to read at times be of the constant POV shifts. Trying to keep up with who’s point of view was very confusing. It would sometimes change multiple times in a chapter. I’d be in Tavis’s head then Sebastian’s and then Jack’s without any warning or transition.

Plot

I’m not sure this book knows what its plot was. It was a dystopian sci-fi, with a focus on meta humans, but it wasn’t that simple. There was romance (more so in the beginning) then later. It was more of a family saga with a sci-fi twist. The biggest issue was all the minuta. I felt like I was drowning in useless scenes and day to day activities more than once that I couldn’t always figure out how that had anything to do with where the book was going. However, there were more than a few scenes and plot points that caught my attention and really shined. This plot was more about the characters then the story, which was evident by the progression of the plot. The characters were all distinct but the plot had a few logical fallacies.

The author held a lot back and introduced new ‘secrets’ that were revelations on the characters and help drive the plot. I wasn’t sure all of the were necessary and some of them felt convenient. Again I think that is because this book was more character driven then plot driven.

Overall

I’d like to start off by saying I don’t like really long books and this book was over 600 pages and took me 10 HOURS TO READ! If you love long intense sagas, this is for sure something you’d love. I struggled through it on more than one occasion. What was worse, after the big conflict there is a character who proceeds to monologue for pages on end as part of the resolution’s. It was all very predictable in more than one way but also complicated. I wasn’t necessarily surprised by some of the developments – they’d been hinted at – but it was subtle and could be easily overlooked.  If all of the chapters could have been more like the epilogue I would have enjoyed it more.

That being said I was impressed by the sheer dedication to detail. It didn’t leave anything to the imagination (for good or bad). With the exception of the setting. The world building was very vague. The complexly woven story and the many twists and turns created a interesting structure. Overall it felt like a very long origin story, which I expect is the first in an equally lengthy series.

Rating

3 Stars

It was okay. This was a speculative fiction that delves deep into the characters lives and felt like a historical saga of their progression. If you like the deep dive into characters lives and thoroughly detailed scenes, then this book is for you.

I received this book for a free and voluntarily review. More reviews at creatingworldswithwords.wordpress.com.

Themis by Paul Weil

**Cannot standalone**

Summary:

SARAH CASTLE is a young celebrity reporter from London who stumbles upon the mystery of twelve extraordinary teenagers. One of them is HENRY BAXTER, an eighteen year-old unknown runner who just won The London Marathon. She accepts a position as the public relations chief for their new charity—THE THEMIS FOUNDATION. Sarah experiences events that can only be described as supernatural; including a cottage that appears normal from the outside, but is infinitely large inside with doors that open all over the world. However, Sarah’s proximity to this extraordinary family might just get her killed. In THEMIS, Sarah discovers the family she desperately wants, a love she didn’t expect, and herself at the center of events that will change the destiny for all of humanity. Themis is the first part of a five book series that will take the reader on an adventure into ancient mythology, a fantastic mystery, and deep inside the most unusual family on Earth.

Characters
Sarah Castle is the main character…or at least I think she is supposed to be. There are so many characters, which normally I like, but I struggled with Themis because the back of the book only really talks about Sarah but she is almost non-existent in the second half of the book. Really there are twelve ‘main’ characters with other critical characters like Titus. The biggest problem I had was I didn’t really connect with any of the characters enough to be invested…which made them all a little flat.

The switching characters messed with me a few times because of some unexpected POV shifts where I wasn’t sure who was actually the main character in that chapter. Also there is this part where Sarah falls and I just went ‘are you serious right now?’ because it was painfully predictable and made me dislike Sarah a little…in many ways she never rebounded from that.

Plot

Absolutely loved the multi-faceted plot. I was curious where the story was going to go because of all the pieces and I could easily see some of the future threads. I could easily see this being made into a TV series and I’d totally watch it. The first book was chock full of plot threads that I found absolutely fascinating. It is a really slow read in a few parts but I actually enjoyed the depth most of the time. A downside is the action scenes left me scratching my head a few times –  some of the movements happening in the matter of seconds seemed excessively fast. Also some of the scenes seemed over the top (the gore and sequences).

Overall

I enjoyed the writing but there were some noticeable editing errors – particularly in the second half of the novel. I also found myself somewhat bored during some parts because the writing was too drawn out and excessive but this was due to my inability to connect with the characters and not the writing or the plot. That being said the settings were brilliantly executed and even with the shifting places the reader gets to visit were painted in such a way that I could easily envision them. The complex plot was fascinating, but some of the action was jarring and not fleshed out.

My favorite part of the book was how the author could drop hints about what was coming and really get me interested in what was going to come next with the story. Overall the real issue of the book for me was the lack of cohesion of the individual character plots and the underdeveloped characters that all of a sudden became really important near the end, but were a footnote in the first half of the book. It really left me scratching my head.

***SPOILER***

Don’t read this unless you want a spoiler, but I felt that there were some clear threads with the Terminator movie. Now that can be a good thing or a bad things but the main character being a Sarah really reminded me of Sarah Connor and not just her name. There were a lot of facts that fit into that similar plot thread that I quickly figured out where this whole thing was going to go by the end of the book, especially after she ‘connected’ with the reluctant leader. I say this hoping that Sarah Castle becomes as awesome as Sarah Connor did, either way it struck a cord with me.

***SPOILER OVER***

Rating

3.5 stars (rounded down)

I really want to give this 4 stars, but between the flaws and the fact that I think I would only recommend this to a select few people, I’m stuck at 3 stars. To give it that extra edge though, I’m going to add the 0.5 because I actually would consider reading the second book. In the end a highly complex but enjoyable plot with characters I struggled to connect with.

I received a copy in exchange for an honest review.

Small side note only for this blog but I really dislike the cover of this book – I feel like it doesn’t capture what this book is about at all and undervalues how good it is. 

The Filmmaker and the Sceptre (within The Wrong Time) by Robby Charters

Summary

A filmmaker of the future, using a new untested medium, gets tangled up in his story in The Filmmaker and the Sceptre.

Overall

A fast paced and clever read. It is a bit jarring at times the way that the scenes change but that is easily fixed the end. I enjoyed the bending and cheekiness of the writing. It is too short to connect in with the charters but the plot is entertaining. There are some editing errors that could be fixed and the writing tightened, but it is minor. Very much a sci-fi meets fantasy read.

Rating

4 Stars

Jarring read that has a very clever ending.

I received a copy in exchange of an honest review.

Life II by Scott Spotson

Summary:

Upon discovering a 1958 book titled “Account of Time Travel on Earth Using Wave Theory,” 42-year-old Max Thorning’s life is thrown into chaos. Seeking answers to the book’s cryptic clues, he discovers Dr. Time, a seemingly benign alien who has control of the Time Weaver, a remarkable device that can command any scene from the Earth’s past. Dr. Time offers him a choice to go back into Time, to any point in his lifespan that he can vividly recall. The catch: he can only bring his memories, and can only live the future one day at a time. Follow Max’s dilemma as he goes back to his 16-year-old self and tries to forge his destiny into a new one called Life II.

Characters

Max is the main character and most of the novel is told from his point of view. The author does a great job of creating very flawed but hopeful character. There are some jarring point of view changes that I think were distracting, but they were luckily few and far between. I don’t want to give too much but I was very impressed with the cast of characters.

Plot*

I’d like to start by saying I HATE TIME TRAVEL BOOKS. They are usually poorly executed and poorly thought out. That is not the case here. This book thoroughly explores the decision to ‘time travel’ and the consequences for doing so. If you love time travel books more for the science aspect, you have to pick this up.

Max decides to travel back to when he was 16 and change his future. He isn’t happy in his current life – particularly his marriage – and he wants to change it. So he does. He agrees to re-write his life.

Overall

It was a captivating prospect. The writing was mostly easy to follow and filled with Max’s emotions. The overall book was lengthy – almost excessively so. Although I did appreciate the level of detail in which Max’s life was explored, I also found myself going cross-eyed during the more mundane portions.  I was really captivated by the last 15% or so. It is important to know that some threads of plot are left unresolved and although Max’s story has a general resolution, it seems to me that the author isn’t done and could pick up one of those incomplete threads.

What really was the deciding factor was the deeply seeded philosophical effects of Max’s choice to travel back. That is what really struck a cord with me. I both pitied and hated Max, while still finding a middle ground to accept his decisions. It was quite an emotional roller-coaster ride!

Rating

3.5 Stars (rounded up)

Despite my hatred for time travel books – this was expertly done. If you like time travel books – this is a must read! Especially if you like more of the human aspects of time travel.

*I received this as a Science Fiction novel and agree with that. However, in my opinion, this is not for teens and is a stretch even for the New Adults genre.

I received a copy in exchange for an honest review.

Albedo by R. Leib

Summary

Ranner’s done a lot of things in his life, defended planets in the HSG, shot it out with pirates, and muscled for smugglers. Now he’s settled down into being a bodyguard so that his adopted daughter can have a normal life. Offered the chance of a lifetime for just doing his job seemed too good to be true. He would have to see what the albedo deflected to know for certain.

Overall

This is a like a hardboiled detective novel but with a science fiction feel. Actually it reminded me of those old noir movies but a futuristic version. For such a short snapshot it had the pieces necessary for a mystery. Ranner is both clever and reformed…as best as he can be from his old ways. The plot was both interesting and horrifying, but I don’t want to say more in case I’ll ruin the mystery. I felt like it was wrapped up a little too easily but may have just been a nod to Ranner’s ability.

Rating

4 stars

A great little detective short story that is a great read for a short lunch break. If you like a grim science fiction with a mystery, this is a great read for you!

I received a copy in exchange of an honest review.